End of the Season

The end of the field season is usually bittersweet. On the one hand, we’ve been gone from our homes for 6 weeks in harsh conditions with not much rest and even fewer showers. We are down to only 4 crew members, all with bent backs and sore knees. Camp food has started to get old and we are longing for our own beds. The sunsets are gorgeous, but it’s been too long since we’ve seen anything green.

On the other hand, we do this because we love the rock, the bone it produces, and the questions those bones raise and may eventually answer. There is still so much to be learned about the mid-Cretaceous dinosaur fauna of North America and its potential interchange with dinosaurs from Asia, as well as the evolution of the feathered dinosaurs, such as our favorite therizinosaur, Falcarius. More data is needed and that’s why we’re out here. It’s hard work, but well worth it.

Last sunset at CGQA sampling of specimens

When we left the Mussentuchit locality 3 weeks ago, we had a wide variety of specimens, including various dinosaurs, turtles, and crocodiles. And as we leave the Crystal Geyser Quarry now, we take with us 170 numbered specimens (some just single bones, some as jackets with multiple bones), from a huge sauropod ischium to a teeny-tiny caudal vertebra (both pictured below). We’ve found bones not previously documented for Falcarius and there’s always the possibility that some of what we’ve found may belong to a previously unknown species. We’ve mapped the location of each and every bone in hopes that their position may tell us what happened to these animals and how their remains came to rest in this place. With all of this new data, we can depart contented.

Sauropod ischiumcaudal vertebra

And so we head home with our trucks “severely overloaded” with fossils. There will be plenty of work to do back at the museum, but our work in the mid-Cretaceous of Utah is over until next year. We are ready to go home.

Final crew shot

Advertisements