Feet On The Ground: The Menefee

After a trying time in the Crevasse Canyon Formation, we had high hopes for more abundant fossils in the Menefee.  This was our first time prospecting this strata but we had teamed up with Andy Heckert and his summer students from Appalachian State University to check out some sites that Andy had found several years ago.  As usual our first day was inspiring but also a bit overwhelming.  Looking out over the expanse of Menefee exposure, it felt like one could spend a lifetime out here prospecting…

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Menefee exposures go on and on…

Unlike the Crevasse Canyon, we found bone all over the place on day one out here, but much of it was encased in nodules. In most cases, mineral growth had invaded the bone, changing it’s structure.  We pulled a partial leg in decent condition before heading up section to find better preserved materials.

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exposed digits from a dinosaur limb

Turned out looking in the younger part of the formation was a good idea.  The next day we found a fruitful basin with a lot of exposed bone, a decent turtle preserved in a sandstone cliff face, and not too far from there, a couple of good sites with multiple dinosaur bones.

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This is what it looks like to find a turtle in a cliff. The shell in cross-section is sticking out just above Lisa’s right arm
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Although a portion of the shell was lost due to erosion of the cliff face, as we chiseled the sandstone from around it, a pretty good carapace began to emerge.
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why, I ask, does our most promising dinosaur site have to be found under 15 feet of this….?

We spent about 10 days in the Menefee prospecting and surface collecting from various sites.  Again the abundance of tracks, both dinosaur, croc, and turtle kept us fairly busy. We were fortunate to find a natural cast of an enormous croc track on the under surface of a sandstone lens bearing pad and scale impressions. It turned out to be a tricky but quick collect as we undercut the block, capped it with plaster, and let it drop to the ground (thankfully, not on any members of the team…) into a rimmed depression we devised.

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stabilizing the croc track before work begins

We had our fair share of injuries and illnesses this trip with altitude sickness, falls, and even kidney stones and a lot of long, back-to-back days of wandering around solo prospecting, which leads to some interesting bouts of creativity.

While Lisa was inventing camp mascots, I tried my hand at a desert snowman…

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Hi Hank
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not bad!

Although our fossil finds were few and far between, there was an abundance of wildlife discoveries including several close encounters with rattlesnakes!

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Rattlers didn’t seem bothered much by our traipsing around

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At the end of our season in the Menefee, we headed further south to explore the northernmost exposures of the Moreno Hill.  Here we found nearly nothing for days aside from some microsites and a single iguanodontipodid track.  Still, we had found enough promising localities this year and last to return in 2018 for a fruitful season. Even if it does involve a week of jackhammering through a sandstone cliff to get at the bones.

Next up….  Montana!

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