Kicking off in New Mexico

Long days and poor cellular service prevented us from blogging in real time during our first expedition of 2017 to Upper Cretaceous formations in northwest New Mexico.  We were able to keep up on Twitter though, so for the expedition play-by-play, check out #NMdinodig17 @expeditionlive.

Still… in the few days after Montana and before heading out to Utah this summer, I thought it’d be a good time to catch you up on how things went.

Last year we kicked off our pilot expedition to the Moreno Hill and Crevasse Canyon formations, strata that span a key, underrepresented interval in the fossil record of dinosaur evolution on the North American continent.  Finding fossils in the Moreno Hill Formation isn’t easy and we spent two weeks, prospecting 8-10 miles a day, with little to show for it last season.  We did find a productive basin near the end of our trip with fossilized turtles, a large croc osteoderm, a lot of random dinosaur bone, and one intriguing locality with over 40 ornithischian vertebrae exposed on the surface (Elk Run).

This year we hoped to open excavations at Elk Run, but our permits were not approved in time so… instead of excavating there, we continued to prospect for productive new areas in northwest New Mexico.  We were particularly interested in the Coniacian-Santonian aged Crevasse Canyon Formation and spent about four days hunting around in fairly good exposures.  The first two nights we woke up to snow (some of us with our tents collapsed onto our faces…), but soon enough things began to warm up.

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there’s nothing like waking up to snow in the desert

We could find only a single published record of dinosaur bone recovered from the Crevasse Canyon–a partial duckbill dinosaur jaw bone. Thus we knew there was potential, but also, that the Crevasse Canyon would make us work for it.  We didn’t have a great deal of luck this year but we begin finding some dinosaur bone on the last couple of days, and ultimately one nice limb bone that continued into the hill.

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A bit of limb bone on the surface

We also found a great leaf locality, and a ton of dinosaur tracks, which are all over the Crevasse Canyon.  I literally pitched my tent on a track horizon in camp and tracks could be found just about everywhere we wandered.

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a little poking around my tent and voila! track casts

We wrapped up this part of the trip by revisiting a cool ornithopod dinosaur track site I found last year.  This time we brought geology undergraduates from Wake Tech, as part of our National Science Foundation GEOPATH award.  Here we documented the site, took photographs to create a photogrammetric model, and evaluated the track morphology and number of trackways preserved.  We’ll be presenting this research at the Geological Society of America’s annual meeting in Seattle.

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Wake Tech student Katie Berry examines the track block

After wrapping up in the Crevasse Canyon we packed up camp and headed north to hunt around in the Menefee Formation.

 

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